Radiation Protection Rules of Thumb & FAQ

A set of radiation protection rules of thumb covering brief guides, frequently asked questions (FAQ), equations or principles, hints and tips for use in the workplace. Use with care (and always with consultation from a Radiation Protection Adviser).

  • What is BAT (Best Available Techniques) as applied to UK environmental permits involving radioactive material or waste?

    Published: Feb 20, 2022

    Source: Ionactive Resource

      Tags:
    • BAT Assessment
    • Environmental Protection
    • Radioactive Waste Adviser (RWA)

    A summary of BAT as applied to working with radioactive materials and radioactive waste in the UK.

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  • What is a category 5 radioactive sealed source (UK)?

    Published: Feb 20, 2022

    Source: Ionactive Resource

      Tags:
    • A/D
    • Radioactive source
    • Category 5 sealed source
    • D (Danger) Value

    A brief explanation of 'category 5' radioactive sealed sources.

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  • What is a Radiation Protection Officer (RPO)?

    Published: Oct 03, 2021

    Source: Ionactive Consulting Radiation Protection Resource

      Tags:
    • RPO
    • Radiation Protection Officer
    • Radiation Protection Officer Training
    • online RPO training course

    A Radiation Protection Officer (RPO) is a specialist in radiation protection defined in the UK and also by IAEA. This resource explains the role of the RPO within UK universities, and the slightly different role within companies using ionising radiation around the world.

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  • Skyshine – radiation scattering around and over shielding

    Published: Sep 29, 2021

      Tags:
    • Skyshine
    • Radiation Shielding
    • Open top radiography
    • Radiation scatter
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  • Protection by reducing exposure time - is it always valid?

    Published: Sep 29, 2021

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  • Inverse Square Law - when is a source a point source?

    Published: Sep 29, 2021

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The definition of 'safe' is not strictly an engineering term; it's a societal term. Does it mean absolutely no loss of life? Does it mean absolutely no contamination with radiation? What exactly does 'safe' mean?

– Henry Petroski -